July Factoids

 

July 1-31

 

July is National Peach Month

In March of 1982, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed July to be National Peach Month. South Carolina is second in the nation in peach production (second only to California). The SC Legislature made the peach the official state fruit in 1984.

 


July Observances (Day):

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30

 

 

1

Battle of Gettysburg Began

July 1-3, 1863: On this day, during the American Civil War, the Battle of Gettysburg began. Gettysburg would be the largest battle of the Civil War, resulting between 46,000 and 51,000 casualties. Gettysburg was a Union victory, and would be cemented in U.S. history as the turning point of the Civil War. (Walter Edgar's Journal)

Canada Day

Canada Day is a Canadian federal holiday to show off national pride and celebrate the country. July 1 was the chosen date because it was the day where three provincial states -- Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the Canada province -- in Canada unified. The holiday was originally referred to as Dominion Day, a call back to the confederation of the individual provinces. The day is celebrated nation-wide.

Elizabeth Dinnforf

Elizabeth Dinndorf was appointed the 18th president of Columbia college on July 1, 2012. She is an advocate for education and women's leadership. (Project Lead SC)

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2

Thurgood Marshall

On July 2, 1908, Thurgood Marshall (the first African American on the U.S. Supreme Court), was born in Baltimore, Maryland. Nominated by President Lyndon B. Johnson, Marshall began his 24 year career on the Supreme Court in 1967. (Road Trip)

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4

Independence Day

A day Americans commemorate the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. View our galleries of historical documents that set the foundation for the United States:

Wars & Conflicts Collection

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6

David Sloan Lewis

On July 6, 1917, David Sloan Lewis was born. He was the recipient of many honors for his work in aviation, aeronautics, and astronautics. (Legacy Of Leadership Profile)

Frida Kahlo

On July 6, 1907, painter Frida Kahlo was born. She used her art to vividly and faithfully record parts of her life. (Artopia)

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7

Marc Chagall

On July 7, 1887, influential artist, Marc Chagall was born. He is best known for his colorful lithographs, book illustrations, paintings and stained glass windows for Roman-Catholic cathedrals. (Artopia)

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10

South Carolina Confederate Flag Removed

On July 10, 2015, the Confederate flag was removed from the grounds of the S.C. State House. View our Collection, SC Confederate Flag, to learn more about the removal of the flag.

World War II - Allied invasion of Italy

July 10, 1943: During World War II, the Allied invasion of Italy began, with an attack on the island of Sicily. The British entry into Syracuse was the first Allied success in Europe. General Dwight D. Eisenhower labeled the invasion "the first page in the liberation of the European Continent." (South Carolinians In WW II)

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12

Battle at Williamson's Plantation (Or Huck's Defeat)

On July 12, 1780, the Patriot militia, led by Colonel Bratton, defeated the British Legion. This battle became known as the "Battle at Williamson's Plantation" or "Huck's Defeat" (Southern Campaign Of The American Revolution)

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14

Woody Guthrie

On July 14, 1912, famous musician, Woody Guthrie, was born. He is the father of the social protest song, and is most well known for the song "This Land Is Your Land." (Artopia)

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15

Charles J. Bradshaw

On July 15, 1936, Charles J. Bradshaw was born. He was inducted into South Carolina Business Hall of Fame in 2006. Bradshaw was known for his illustrious business career in S.C., and for founding Bradshaw Investments. (Legacy Of Leadership Profile)

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16

Ginger Rogers

On July 16, 1911, dancer Ginger Rogers was born. She and her dancing partner, Fred Astaire, created a dancing style that wove together movements from vaudeville, ballroom, tap, soft shoe and ballet. (Artopia)

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18

Second Battle of Fort Wagner

July 18, 1863: The Second Battle of Fort Wagner took place during the American Civil War. Battery Wagner was located on Morris Island, in Charleston, S.C. This battle would immortalize the Massachusetts 54th Infantry: the first African-American regiment formed in the Union, commanded by Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. The regiment suffered heavy casualties during the assault on the fort. The movie "Glory" tells the story of this famed regiment. (Walter Edgar's Journal). 

Jerome J. Richardson

On July 18, 1936, South Carolina Business Hall of Famer Jerome J. Richardson was born. He is a former NFL player and the founder and principal owner of Carolina Panthers. (Legacy Of Leadership Profile)

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19

National Ice Cream Day

Celebrated on the third Sunday in July, National Ice Cream Day was founded in 1984 by President Ronald Reagan to encourage people to go out and eat ice cream. Take the day to stack a cone tall enough with all of your favorite flavors to cool down in the peak of the hot summer months. Check out how ice cream is made on this episode of Eye Wonder.

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20

Nam June Paik

Nam June Paik was born on July 20, 1932, in Seoul, Korea. Throughout his career, Paik has found inspiration in working with some of the most innovative musicians, artists, poets, dancers, and technicians of his day. (Artopia)

National Moon Day

"That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind!" On July 20, 1969, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong made world history when he became the first man to walk on the surface of the moon. Learn more about The Space Race, and how America got to the moon! 

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22

Public Enemy #1 - John Dillinger

July 22, 1934: Infamous American bank robber John Dillinger, labeled by the FBI as "Public Enemy #1", was killed outside of a movie theater in an FBI sting operation by agent Melvin Purvis. In 1933, after Dillinger spent nine years in prison, he went on a deadly crime spree, robbing banks throughout the states of Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa. (Carolina Stories)

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23

National Hot Dog Day

July 23 honors this all-American food – the hot dog – and encouraged observers to throw some over the grill and spend some time with family and friends. The day is sometimes celebrated with festivals and contests.

Abbeville, Part 3 – Billiards (and Hot Dogs) | Palmetto Places

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24

Amelia Earhart

July 24, 1897: American aviator Amelia Earhart was born in Atchison, Kansas. In 1928, she became the first woman to fly across the Atlantic Ocean, and in 1931, she broke the men's and women's altitude record, flying at 18,415 feet above ground. Earhart disappeared under mysterious circumstances on July 2, 1937, at 39 years old. (Periscope)

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28

Charles H. Townes

On July 28, 1915, South Carolinian scientist, Charles H. Townes was born. He is the only person other than Dalai Lama and Mother Teresa to win both a Templeton Prize and a Nobel Prize. (S.C. Hall of Fame)

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30

International Day of Friendship 

The United Nations declared July 30 the International Day of Friendship in 2011 because of all the wonderful bridges friendship builds when it is fostered between people, communities, countries, etc. The holiday is meant for youth, to facilitate friendships among our future leaders and build respect for diversity and interpersonal relations. Friendship is the key to sharing the human spirit.

Families, Feelings & Friendship (Scholastic Children’s Stories)  
Stories related to families, feelings and friendship from Scholastic Children's Stories

Friendship Nine 
A group of nine African American young men who were sent to jail after staging a sit-in at a segregated McCrory's lunch counter in Rock Hill, South Carolina in 1961.

Jail, No Bail
Documentary pays tribute to the “Friendship Nine,” a group of college students who were arrested for a lunch counter sit-in in Rock Hill, SC in 1961. Instead of paying bail (as was the norm with all previous sit-ins), they served 30 days of hard labor, making the city pay to house, feed & clothe them, thus turning the tables & drying up a dubious revenue stream. This movement caught on nationally, changing the entire sit-in strategy. The program was the centerpiece of 50th anniversary events, and still has legs today. It included extensive television, educational and community outreach initiatives.

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REVISIONS

Revised by Eva Chillaru, 2021 ETV Endowment Intern, June 2021

Revised by Andrew Davis, Media Production Assistant, 2018 

These factoids were compiled by Imani-Grace King, 2017 ETV Endowment Intern 

 

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