Sea Change, Part 1 - Introduction

1.The divisive topic of climate change has been an ongoing debate in recent history. Questions like, “what do we save?” “Who do we save?” and “How do we save?” are among the many questions people are asking about saving the environment, and vulnerable communities.

Evidence of rising ocean levels and changes in the climate are more apparent at Hunting Island State Park, in South Carolina, than hardly anywhere else on the East coast of the U.S. Visitors can see this evidence first-hand by viewing the swath of damage from rising ocean levels, and storms. With the rising of sea levels, levels of uncertainty rise with it.

Mayor John J. Tecklenburg of Charleston, S.C., discusses the “nuisance flooding” occurring in the county, and how water levels are expected to rise somewhere between 1.5 to 2.5 feet, over the next 30 years. Rising water levels are a major issue, and can not only effect the ecosystem, but also the economy, and peoples’ daily lives.

All park projects are also being affected by climate change, since the coast is not the only affected area. Further inland, droughts and erosions are also evident of climate change. The National Park service has had to implement a climate change response strategy.  

Another problem the country faces with rising water levels is the increase of mosquito populations, and the creeping of diseases known in Central and South America, coming farther up North.