Native Americans

Find out how members of the Santee Indians and Varnertown Indians experienced the Civil Rights Movement in South Carolina.

Type
Alice Faye Broad Hincka | Road Trip
Alice Faye Broad Hincka | Road Trip

Video

Alice Faye Broad Hincka attended the Varner Indian School and Moncks Corner Junior High School. Alice shares her memories of growing up in the Varner community.
Charles Rodgers | Road Trip
Charles Rodgers | Road Trip

Video

Disabled veteran, Charles Edward Rodgers, attended Varner Indian School, Berkeley Elementary, and Berkeley High School. He is proud of his Native American Heritage as a Varner Town Indian and speaks...
Failing Students | Road Trip
Failing Students | Road Trip

Video

Desiree Platt talks about her experiences with segregation. Native Americans were allowed to attend school only up to eighth grade.
Henry J. Clark | Road Trip
Henry J. Clark | Road Trip

Video

Henry J. Clark attended the Pineview Indian School in the late 1930s and the Varner Indian School in the early 1940s.
Martha Varner | Road Trip
Martha Varner | Road Trip

Video

Martha Varner attended the Pineview School and the Varner Indian School during the 1930s and early 1940s. She recalls as a child being called "Brass Ankle" by other children passing by on school buses...
Minority Business | Road Trip
Minority Business | Road Trip

Video

In 1974, Henry J. Clark received his Residential Building and Remodeling State License for South Carolina, one of the first for Native Americans in this state. He built and sold many houses and...
Native American Community Store | Road Trip
Native American Community Store | Road Trip

Video

T.L. Scott, the former Chief of Santee Indian Organization talks about his family's community store. T.L. Scott speaks about being treated "almost normal" compared to the blacks in the area.
No High School | Road Trip
No High School | Road Trip

Video

T.L. Scott, the former Chief of Santee Indian Organization, talks about not being allowed to go to high school after the eighth grade.