SC Life - The Cove Forest Credits

The Cove Forest

Cove Forests are unique ecosystems found exclusively in North America, in the southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States. They are a special type of forest known as mixed decidous, meaning that forest's trees lose their leaves in fall. Cove forests are restricted to mountain "coves," which are bowl-shaped valleys with very rich, fertile, damp soil. Many cove forests have streams wandering through part of the forest. The cove forests of the South exhibit the greatest plant and tree diversity of any forests in the United States.

The cove forests of South Carolina are restricted to the northwest portion of the state, extending from the north of Westminster to north of Greenville, Jones Gap State Park, Table Rock State Park, Oconee State Park, and Caesars Head State Park all contain cove forest communities. 

AUTHORS

Dr. Ed Pivorun is a professor of zoology at Clemson University. He teaches courses in mammalogy, comparative animal physiology, and tropical biology. His research program includes the physiology of mammalian hibernation and daily torpor. He is currently funded to survey the mammal species distributions within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park as part of the All Taxa Biological Inventory, sponsored by Discover Life in America. His e-mail address is EBPVR@clemson.edu

Dr. Tim Spira is a professor of botany at Clemson University. He teaches courses in plant ecology, field botany and ecology of the southern Appalachians. His research interests include studies of the interaction of pollinators and plants. He is currently writing a natural history book examining major plant communities in the Carolinas. His e-mail address is STOMOTH@clemson.edu

PRODUCTION

Executive Producer: John Bane
Producer, Designer, Art Director, Flash Programmer: Mark Ross
Photography: Ed Pivorun, Tim Spira
Videography: Gaines Halford, Mark Ross
Proofreaders: Nicole Stonecypher, Brenda Ward
Curriculum Specialist: Angela Black

REFERENCES

Adams, Kevin, and Marty Casstevens. 1996. Wildflowers of the Southern Appalachians. John F Blair, Publisher, Winston-Salem, NC

Alden, Peter, and Gil Nelson. 1999. National Audubon Society Field Guide to the Southeastern States. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, NY

Bentley, Stanley. 2000. Native Orchids of the Southern Appalachian Mountains. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC

Brown, Larry. 1997. A Guide to the Mammals of the Southeastern United States. The University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville, TN

Case, Jr., Frederick, and Roberta Case. 1997. Trilliums. Timber Press, Portland, OR

Conant, Roger, and Joseph Collins. 1998. Reptiles and Amphibians Eastern/Central North America. Houghton Mufflin Co., Boston, MA

Constantz, George. 1995. Hollows, Peepers and Highlanders: An Appalachian Mountain Ecology. Mountain Press Publishing Co., Missoula, MT

Duncan, Wilbur, and Marion Duncan. 1988. Trees of the Southeastern United States. University of Georgia Press, Athens, GA

Duncan, Wilbur, and Marion Duncan. 1999. Wildflowers of the Eastern United States. The University of Georgia Press, Athens, GA

Farrand, John. 1988. An Audubon Handbook: Eastern Birds. McGraw-Hill

Halfpenny, James, and Jim Bruchac. 2002. Scats and Tracks of the Southeast. Falcon, Guilford, CN

Kays, Roland, and Don Wilson. 2002. Mammals of North America. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ

Kricher, John, and Gordon Morrison. 1988. Eastern Forests. Houghton Mifflin Press, Boston, MA

Lellinger, David. 1985. A Field Manual of the Ferns and Fern-allies of the United States and Canada. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC

Linzey, Donald. 1995. Mammals of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The McDonald & Woodward Publishing Co., Blacksburg, VA

Linzey, Donald. 1998. The Mammals of Virginia. The McDonald And Woodward Publishing Co., Blacksburg, VA

Martof, Bernard, and William Palmer, Joseph Bailey and Julian Harrison III. 1980. Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC

McDaniel, Lynda. 1998. Highroad Guide to the North Carolina Mountains. Longstreet, Atlanta, GA

Mitchell, Joseph. 1994. The Reptiles of Virginia. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC

Palmer, William, and Alvin Braswell. 1995. Reptiles of North Carolina. The University Of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC

Peattie, Donald. 1977. A Natural History of Trees of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mufflin Co., Boston, MA

Petranka, James. 1998. Salamanders of the United States and Canada. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC

Porcher, Richard, and Douglas Rayner. 2001. A Guide to the Wildflowers of South Carolina. University of South Carolina Press, Columbia, SC

Rohde, Fred, and Rudolf Arndt, David Lindquist and James Parnell. 1994. Freshwater Fishes of the Carolinas, Virginia, Maryland and Delaware. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC

Simpson, Jr., Marcus. 1992. Birds of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC

Smith, Richard. 1998. Wildflowers of the Southern Mountains. The University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville, TN

Strutin, Michele, and Tony Arruza. 1997. The Smithsonian Guides to Natural America: The Southeast. Smithsonian Books, Washington, DC

Sutton, Ann, and Myron Sutton. 1985. Eastern Forests. Alfred A Knopf, New York, NY

Tilley, Steven and James Huheey. 2001. Reptiles & Amphibians of the Smokies. Great Smokies Natural History Association, Gatlinburg, TN

Weber, Nancy, and Alexander Smith. 1985. A Field Guide to Southern Mushrooms. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MI

Webster, David, and James Parnell and Walter Biggs, Jr.. 1985. Mammals of the Carolinas, Virginia, and Maryland. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC

Whitaker, Jr., John, and William Hamilton, Jr. 1998. Mammals of the Eastern United States. Comstock Publishing Associates, Ithica, NY