The civil rights movement started from the grassroots efforts of everyday people. Through petitions, court cases and often times job loss, determined individuals were able to fight for equality all the way to the Supreme Court.

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Atty. Dorothy Sampson | Road Trip
Atty. Dorothy Sampson | Road Trip

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Dorothy Sampson became the first African American female attorney in Sumter. Her area of interest was civil rights litigation, voter education and registration. She was a plaintiff in a suit against...
Billie Fleming on Farming | Road Trip
Billie Fleming on Farming | Road Trip

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Mr. Billie Fleming explains the hardship that farmers, teachers and anyone associated with the NAACP during the civil rights movement encountered in their communities from white citizens.
Chief Justice Ernest A. Finney | Road Trip
Chief Justice Ernest A. Finney | Road Trip

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Chief Justice Ernest A. Finney gained respect as an exceptional civil rights advocate defending more than 6,000 people arrested for participating in some type of civil protest. He was appointed to the...
Dr. Gloria Blackwell | Road Trip
Dr. Gloria Blackwell | Road Trip

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Dr. Gloria (Rackley) Blackwell was active in the NAACP Youth Council at Claflin College. As an activist throughout her life, Dr. Blackwell was most noted for her lawsuit against the Orangeburg...
Jim Crow & KKK | Road Trip
Jim Crow & KKK | Road Trip

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Many of the Briggs v. Elliott plaintiffs and those associated with them experienced intimidation and violence at the hands of the Klu Klux Klan (KKK), a white supremacy group. Living in the area...
Judge Matthew Perry, Jr. | Road Trip
Judge Matthew Perry, Jr. | Road Trip

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Beginning in the 1950s, Judge Matthew Perry, Jr became the leading civil rights lawyer in South Carolina. Judge Perry was the first African American federal judge in South Carolina. The Matthew J...
Native American Community Store | Road Trip
Native American Community Store | Road Trip

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T.L. Scott, the former Chief of Santee Indian Organization talks about his family's community store. T.L. Scott speaks about being treated "almost normal" compared to the blacks in the area.