Women's Rights Supporters' First Meeting | Periscope

First Meeting held at Stanton House
Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott and a small group of women's rights supporters met at Elizabeth's house in 1848 to plan the first women's rights convention.
 
In addition to writing the Declaration of Sentiments, the group also made plans for a women's rights convention. The result of their planning was the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, the first of its kind in the United States. At the convention, Mott and Stanton presented the Declaration of Sentiments to a crowd of more than 300 men and women. It was signed by 68 women and 32 men, and laid the groundwork for a women's rights movement.
 
As people became more united behind the cause of women's rights, conventions and rallies provided meeting places to establish the goals of the movement. In 1850, a thousand women and men came together in Massachusetts for the first "National Women's Rights Convention." Lucretia Mott and other women's rights leaders gave speeches. There were also speeches by anti-slavery activists such as Frederick Douglass. The anti-slavery and the women's rights groups both wanted equality. Equality meant more job and educational opportunities; and "suffrage", the right to vote. The convention was successful in getting out their message, though it would be many years before women attained the right to vote.In addition to writing the Declaration of Sentiments, the group also made plans for a women's rights convention. The result of their planning was the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848, the first of its kind in the United States. At the convention, Mott and Stanton presented the Declaration of Sentiments to a crowd of more than 300 men and women. It was signed by 68 women and 32 men, and laid the groundwork for a women's rights movement.
 
Photo courtesy: Women's Rights National Historical Park