Uncommon Folk

There are some artists that fall outside of the definition of fine art. Sometimes referred to as folk, outsider, visionary or memory artists, most are driven to create something that has a special meaning to them. Some use objects from their own back yard, or illustrate personal visions or cultural history, while others use art to cope with life. Some are celebrated locally, while the work of others goes unseen until their deaths. One thing they have in common is that they are destined to leave their impression on this world through their work.

Carolina Stories: Uncommon Folk takes a look at some of South Carolina's unique self-taught artists in conjunction with the SC State Museum exhibit by the same title. Visit the exhibit at the South Carolina State Museum.

Featured in the SCETV program are Maxie McConnell Eades, Reverend Johnnie Simmons, L.C. Carson, Sam Doyle, Ernest Lee and Margaret Robbins. Uncommon Folk was produced, directed, edited and narrated by Lynn Cornfoot.

Closed captioning has been provided for this broadcast program.

Type
Introduction And Maxie Eades | Carolina Stories
Introduction And Maxie Eades | Carolina Stories

Video

South Carolina has a high percentage of artistically inspired and talented people, and features a rich heritage of "folk art." However, there are also other artists labeled as "folk" whose artistic...
Ernest Lee | Carolina Stories
Ernest Lee | Carolina Stories

Video

Ernest Lee, also known as “The Chicken Man” is not only known in South Carolina’s Midlands area, but travels all over the southeast to sell his artworks. The majority of his art are acrylic paintings...
L.C. Carson | Carolina Stories
L.C. Carson | Carolina Stories

Video

L.C. Carson, a self-taught artist, built a folk art environment in his own backyard, in Orangeburg, South Carolina. Carson was known for his love of trains, and when he began to use concrete as a...
Sam Doyle | Carolina Stories
Sam Doyle | Carolina Stories

Video

Sam Doyle, from St. Helena Island, South Carolina, is able to capture the Gullah community, and represent who they are in his paintings.